Craig Kalpakjian
Robert Miller Gallery, NYC
March 3 - 28
by diane ludin - 04/05/1998

from
[thing.reviews]


 
 



We find ourselves at the end of the millenium on the heels of rapid changes brought about by the information age. Craig Kalpakjian's recent exhibition of computer generated photographs at Robert Miller reconsiders this shift by focusing on the empty passages, halls, doorways and vents of a downsized economy. The photographs give us a private, almost intimate, view of an enigmatic public situation.
Craig Kalpakjian, Emergency Light, 1997.
Craig Kalpakjian, Emergency Light, 1997.
  As the industrial revolution saw the demise of agrarian culture's stability, so the informatic age is witness to changes within the corporate entity, no longer bound by law, morality, ethics, the church, the state, or even itself. What remains is a strange, utilitarian architecture--barren and unyielding.

Missing in Kalpakjian's project is the nostalgia other forms of artmaking carry with them. The work is created through the most efficient and contemporary medium to which we have access--the computer. His use of the Form-Z program to model the spaces and ElectricImage software to render the surfaces push the phantasm of realism beyond itself.

Craig Kalpakjian, Lobby, 1997.
Craig Kalpakjian, Lobby, 1997.
  Kalpakjian's choice of visual assembly sidesteps the potential novelty of its process by moving it beyond the formalist trap early modernist's suffered from. By his choice of subject matter and construction, he creates one of the few successful strategies for connecting the innovations of art and technology. Indeed, it is rare to see representions of our current condition of mythic hype, and affluence, create such subtle, eloquent comments on the merging of art and technological progress.
Craig Kalpakjian, Hallway, 1997.
Craig Kalpakjian, Hallway, 1997.
 

© THE THING 1998
 



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